Sleep well means more feelings of gratitude

Knowledge
Pic Courtesy Science Daily saying "We all know that getting a good night's sleep is good for our general health and well-being. But new research is highlighting a more surprising benefit of good sleep: more feelings of gratitude for relationships. (Credit: © detailblick / Fotolia)"
Pic Courtesy Science Daily saying “We all know that getting a good night’s sleep is good for our general health and well-being. But new research is highlighting a more surprising benefit of good sleep: more feelings of gratitude for relationships. (Credit: © detailblick / Fotolia)”

Sleep is good for health.The new research has established that there is more benefit of good sleep:”more feelings of gratitude for relationships”,reports Science Daily.

The Daily quotes Amie Gordon of the University of California, Berkeley sayinh:””A plethora of research highlights the importance of getting a good night’s sleep for physical and psychological well-being, yet in our society, people still seem to take pride in needing, and getting, little sleep.”

“And in the past, research has shown that gratitude promotes good sleep, but our research looks at the link in the other direction and, to our knowledge, is the first to show that everyday experiences of poor sleep are negatively associated with gratitude toward others — an important emotion that helps form and maintain close social bonds.”

Further the Daily says that social psychologists are increasingly finding that “prosocial” behavior — including expressing gratitude and giving to others — is key to our psychological well-being.

“Even how we choose to spend our money on purchases affects our health and happiness. And children develop specific ways to help others from a very young age. Gordon and other researchers will be presenting some of these latest findings at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) annual meeting January 19 in New Orleans”,said the same Science Daily article adding:

“Sleeping to feel grateful

A large body of research has documented that people who experience gratitude are happier and healthier. In three new studies, Gordon and Serena Chen, also of the the University of California, Berkeley, explored how poor sleep affects people’s feelings of gratitude.

In the first study, people who experienced a poor night’s sleep were less grateful after listing five things in life for which they were appreciative than were people who had slept well the night before. The researchers adapted the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, which measures sleep quality and number of hours slept, among other variables, to evaluate the previous night’s sleep.

In the second study, participants recorded their sleep from the previous night for two weeks and their feelings of gratitude. The researchers found a decline in gratitude associated with poor sleep, and those participants reported feeling more selfish those days.”

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